The Walking Dead Update brings you all the latest news,videos,spoilers,and more from AMC's hit series The Walking Dead!

Facebook

AMC Shares “The Walking Dead” Viewing Habits With Facebook And Is Getting Sued Over It

Facebook logo Español: Logotipo de Facebook Fr...

Facebook logo Español: Logotipo de Facebook Français : Logo de Facebook Tiếng Việt: Logo Facebook (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

To some invasion of privacy is as worrisome as the pending zombie apocalypse. A class action lawsuit has been filed against AMC for allegedly sharing its website’s users viewing habits with Facebook without permission.

Ethel Austin-Spearman is one ticked off The Walking Dead fan. Since 2013, Spearman has been visiting AMC’s website to watch video clips of the hit zombie show. Unbeknownst to her, every time she stayed logged in on her Facebook account and watched a clip, AMC would share that information with Facebook. AMC transmits the user’s Facebook identification as well as the title of the video viewed by the individual. This is not just for The Walking Dad but for any other video on AMC’s website. Facebook can use that information for any purpose including creating targeted advertisements based upon the user’s viewing habits. For example, if Facebook knows that Spearman is spending time watching clips of The Walking Dead it may show her an advertisement for a website that sells zombie merchandise.

Spearman filed a class action lawsuit on behalf of herself and similar situated AMC website users for violation of the Video Privacy Protection Act which prohibits the disclosure of video viewing records without a person’s express written consent. She seeks damages of $2,500 per violation which could be an astronomical numbers based on the number of Facebook users that have had their information shared.

Advertisements

The Walking Dead Season 5 Filming Spoilers: Eugene, Glenn, Tyler’s New Character, More Spotted

It’s time for another round of Spot The Walking Dead Character on the Season 5 Set!

The cast and crew are still filming the second half of Season 5, and will continue to do so until late November. Last week, The Spoiling Dead fans shared on-set updates, with the following actors/characters seen on location in Georgia: Rick Grimes (Andrew Lincoln), Father Gabriel Stokes (Seth Gilliam), Sasha (Sonequa Martin-Green), Maggie (Lauren Cohan), Abraham (Michael Cudlitz), Rosita (Christian Serratos), Michonne (Danai Gurira), Carol (Melissa McBride), Tara (Alanna Masterson), Glenn (Steven Yeun), Tyreese (Chad Coleman), the new character played by Tyler Williams, Daryl Dixon (Norman Reedus), Carl Grimes (Chandler Riggs) and even baby Judith.

(more…)


Video

THE WALKING DEAD NOSTALGIA Season 4 Deleted Scenes, Specials, Revisits and a Look Ahead at Season 5

WalkingDead_ComicCon

So it is now time to sadly say goodbye to season 4 and eagerly get ready to greet season 5. I think I have put together a decent compilation of quality videos to represent both the above mentioned seasons. I hope you both approve of my choices and enjoy them as a fair salute to the wonderful ground breaking series that is The Walking Dead!

The Walking Dead Season 4 Premiere

The Walking Dead Season 4 Preview

 

The Walking Dead Season 4 Special Inside HD 720 Parts 1,2,3

(more…)


The Walking Dead vs The Emmy Snubs (Snobs) #TheWalkingDead #TWDUpdate

Let’s just get right down to it. How on earth can the most popular show in cable history NOT win an Emmy in some field? Really? Firstly let’s look at the Emmy Award itself, which seems flawed in and of itself. You PAY to be a judge. Don’t get me wrong lets have a look at the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (ATAS), headquartered in Los Angeles, who gives out the Emmy awards for prime time programs. Which is made up of ‘peers’ who pay to become part of the academy, which in turn gives them the right to judge. Granted they are put into ‘peer groups’ depending on what their job is or was in the television industry.

“The academy has an Awards Committee that handles the Emmys every year. The awards for prime time programs are presented in August or September, and to be eligible, shows had to be aired on broadcast or cable television during prime time (6 p.m. to 2 a.m.) between June1 and May 31. Also, they had to be seen in markets representing at least 51 percent of the television viewers in the United States.”

Here is there wonderfully vague info-graphic:

how-an-emmy-is-won-2014-843x7710

Now lets have a gander at this story by Time Magazine :

The Walking Dead is unstoppable. For those who watch the AMC series — or read the Image comic book that serves as its source material — this shouldn’t come as a surprise. No matter how many undead walkers you manage to take down, there is a seemingly endless supply of others waiting to take their place.

In this case, however, I’m not describing the fictional zombies inside the show, but the show itself.

In terms of ratings, The Walking Dead consistently wins the all-important 18-49 demographic, even outperforming the Olympics twice, with each new season premiere bucking trends by growing its audience as opposed to traditional standard attrition. By any objective measurement, the show is a success, if not an outright phenomenon. But why?

The most obvious answer to that question is that there isn’t anything else like The Walking Dead around right now. Not only does it go further than audiences expect from horror television (a genre that is, in and of itself, a rarity), but its ongoing serialized nature separates it from the finite horror movies to which it owes so much; by removing the need to wrap up storylines within two hours, the show allows audiences to develop emotional attachments to characters in a way that’s historically unavailable for this kind of story, even as the ongoing narrative pushes the idea of the aftermath of a zombie apocalypse into new, unexplored territory. As a result, even the monotony of some second season episodes felt “new” in some way. Fans actually care about the characters’ outcomes when their safety is jeopardized.

Beyond that, the show’s success also speaks to the versatility of the zombie genre — or, more precisely, the fact that there’s so much metaphorical potential to be found within it. Viewers can read a lot of subtext and hidden meaning into The Walking Dead (“What do the walkers represent?” “Is the Governor a commentary on a particular worldview?” “Is Rick a commentary on modern man?” and so on); more, perhaps, than is even actually present from the writers’ points of view. The show, to borrow a phrase, contains multitudes.

And yet, the show doesn’t consist of multitudes. The short run of each series likely contribute to the show’s continued success as well. With each season consisting of no more than sixteen episodes split into two blocks broadcast months apart, the show is never really on long enough for audiences to get bored of it. The limited scheduling leads to audience perception of scarcity — that it needs to be appreciated immediately on the rare occasions when it is available.

With all that in mind — especially the fact that these various tricks and gimmicks have led to what is one of the most popular shows on television right now, at least as far as advertisers are concerned — it’s worth wondering why nobody else is trying to create their own Walking Dead-style hit. Don’t other networks want a phenomenon of their own, after all?

This is a stickier question, because the obvious response is, “Well, of course everyone wants a Walking Dead of their own.” But making that happen is another thing entirely, particularly when the nature of the show’s success feels like the result of a Jenga tower of elements that’s difficult to pick apart.

Obviously, creating another show about a band of survivors of a zombie apocalypse would be too blunt in terms of replicating the Walking Dead DNA, but how far can you get from that without viewers deciding they’re not that interested after all? We’ve seen other series about disparate survivors of a particularly apocalyptic event before, and those shows haven’t found enough of an audience to survive, never mind thrive in the way that the AMC drama does. Was it a tonal issue, or does it have to be zombies? Could Jericho have survived if it had limited itself to sixteen episodes a year, spaced far enough apart?

(Okay, probably not on that last one. There are some things — such as Skeet Ulrich’s anti-charisma — of which even absence cannot make the heart grow fond.)

That AMC is developing a spin-off of The Walking Dead feels important to this discussion. Obviously, that show — to debut next year — will have to play with the formula of its parent to avoid being a pale imitation, and the success (or otherwise) of that show may offer pointers for how others could develop their own variations on the Walking Dead DNA. More importantly, it’ll also demonstrate how an increased supply impacts demand for the show. What if the new show’s arrival grows the audience for The Walking Dead — or pushes them away? How much undead zombie drama is too much?

For now, The Walking Dead reigns supreme, but there’s no doubt that someone is out there working on programming that’s even more virulent and addictive. Nothing on television lives forever, after all — not even the undead.”-end

 

Now let’s have a look at a few facts from Forbes 3-30-2014:

After AMC bought the pilot based on Robert Kirkman’s comics, the show has more than tripled its ratings in less than four years. And, based on past performance, this season is likely to end with a record-breaking hour of television tonight. Here are eight things to know about the most popular show on television on the eve of what might be its biggest night ever.

  1. A Fast Start: The October 31, 2010 premiere of The Walking Dead was seen by 5.3 million viewers. In the highly-coveted 18-49 year old demographic, the episode trailed only LeBron James’ first game with the Miami Heat, beating the World Series and 30 Rock.  The show dipped below 5 million viewers only twice that first season.
  2. Was Followed by a Huge Jump: The most significant ratings jump came with the season three premiere. The season two finale “Beside The Dying Fire” drew 8.99 million viewers, which was the show’s best to that point. The season three opener? “Seed” drew a whopping 10.87 million viewers.
  3. The Ratings Broke Records: In its third season The Walking Dead established itself as the highest rated show on cable television. The season four premiere, “30 Days Without an Accident,” which aired on October 13, 2013, was the highest-rated hour of cable television ever with a whopping 16.11 million viewers. What did it top? Disney’s High School Musical   
  4. While the Demographics Astounded: As phenomenal as the ratings have been, they still lag slightly behind a few of the most popular shows on network television, like CBS’s NCIS. But when you factor in demographics, The Walking Dead defeats all comers. As far back as Season 2, the show was setting records in the coveted 18-49 year old bracket. The season four premiere drew 10.4 million viewers in that demo. By comparison, the Breaking Bad series-topping finale drew 6.7 million. TWD routinely tops even prime live programming like NFL Sunday Night Football and the Winter Olympics. The one challenger that TWD couldn’t top: The Oscars.
  5. Which Means Big Money:  The Walking Dead ‘s ad rates are the highest of any cable show at as much at $600,000 per spot, a number which rivals NFL broacasts, where rates for the top games are $570,000. By comparison, the highest rates in a scripted show are CBS’s Big Bang Theory at $326,000 per spot.
  6. Even When You’re Just Talking About It: One of the true cash cows in The Walking Dead franchise is Talking Dead, the post-broadcast talk show hosted by Chris Hardwick consistently attracts between four and five million viewers, including 6.01 million for the season 4 mid-season finale. Not bad for a show that, unlike the production-heavy Walking Dead, costs almost nothing to produce. WD3 jpeg
  7. Premieres Push The Envelope: While the show’s plot twists may keep the audiences guessing, its viewership numbers have followed consistent trend.  As you can see in the chart above, the biggest jumps have come season to season. with each season premiere to date adding millions oaf viewers. The mid-season finales have posted modest ratings followed by a bump for the mid-season premiere.
  8. But the Finales Set Records: In the shows three previous seasons The Walking Dead season finale has also been the highest rated episode of the season, usually by a modest margin, adding between 1.6 and 1.8 million viewers to the record set in the premier. So look for tonight’s episode to again be the highest rated hour in the history of cable, adding about 1.7 million viewers to the 16.1 million viewers from the season premiere, for a new record total of 17.8 million viewers.”-end

 

Is the picture becoming clear? It is without a doubt the on and off again best show on television…period. People are hooked, and it has already gone way past cult status. Don’t get me wrong they win awards. Let’s look at their Emmy wins:

Primetime Emmy Awards 2013

Nominated
Primetime Emmy
Outstanding Prosthetic Makeup for a Series, Miniseries, Movie or a Special
Greg Nicotero (special makeup effects department head)
Jake Garber (key special makeup effects artist)
Andy Schoneberg (special makeup effects artist)
Garrett Immel (special makeup effects artist)
Kevin Wasner (special makeup effects artist)
Gino Crognale (special makeup effects artist)
Carey Jones (prosthetic designer)
Derek Krout (prosthetic designer)
American Movie Classics (AMC)

For episode: “This Sorrowful Life”.

 

Primetime Emmy Awards 2012

Won
Primetime Emmy
Outstanding Prosthetic Makeup for a Series, Miniseries, Movie or a Special
Greg Nicotero (special makeup effects department head)
Jake Garber (special makeup effects artist)
Andy Schoneberg (special makeup effects artist)
Kevin Wasner (special makeup effects artist)
Gino Crognale (special makeup effects artist)
Carey Jones (special makeup effects artist)
Garrett Immel (prosthetic designer)

For episode “What Lies Ahead”
Nominated
Primetime Emmy
Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series
Jerry Ross (supervising sound editor)
Lou Thomas (dialogue adr editor)
Tim Farrell (sound effects editor)
Phil Barrie (sound effects editor)
David Lee Fein (foley artist)
Hilda Hodges (foley artist)

For episode “Beside the Dying Fire”
Outstanding Special Visual Effects
Victor Scalise (visual effects supervisor)
Jason Sperling (visual effects supervisor)
Darrell Pritchett (special effects supervisor)
Eddie Bonin (visual effects producer)
Valeri Pfahning (lead 2D artist)
Spence Fuller (2D artist)
Martin Hilke (2D artist)
Michael Cook (lead 3D artist)
Jon Rosenthal (3D artist)

For episode “Beside the Dying Fire”

 

Primetime Emmy Awards 2011

Won
Primetime Emmy
Outstanding Prosthetic Makeup for a Series, Miniseries, Movie or a Special
Greg Nicotero (special makeup effects department head)
Andy Schoneberg (special makeup effects artist)
Garrett Immel (special makeup effects artist)
Jake Garber (special makeup effects artist)
Kevin Wasner (special makeup effects artist)
Howard Berger (prosthetic designer)
Jaremy Aiello (prosthetic designer)
American Movie Classics (AMC)

For episode “Days Gone Bye”.
Nominated
Primetime Emmy
Outstanding Special Visual Effects for a Series
Sam Nicholson (lead visual effects supervisor)
Jason Sperling (visual effects supervisor)
Kent Johnson (visual effects producer)
Kristin Johnson (lead matte artist)
Christopher D. Martin (lead visual effects compositor)
Michael Enriquez (lead model maker)
Anthony Ocampo (lead visual effects animator)
Michael Cook (lead cgi artist)
Greg Nicotero (lead special effects artist)

For episode “Days Gone Bye”.
Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series
Walter Newman (supervising sound editor)
Kenneth Young (co-supervisor/sound editor)
Darleen Stoker (supervising dialogue editor)
Jerry Edemann (supervising foley editor)
Michael Baber (music editor)
Hilda Hodges (foley artist)
David Lee Fein (foley artist)

For episode “Days Gone Bye”.

Am I the only one that sees a problem with this ‘system’ compared to viewer choice awards. The facts don’t fit the wins or the lowly nominations. It cannot be pure chance, and it sure as hell isn’t based off pure fact. I think… excuse my french, it’s time these elitists get off there asses, stop treating it like a social club, be serious, do their research, then above all else DO THEIR JOBS! Enough said! I am not even close to the only one who thinks they were just snubbed and had no chance regardless of the jobs they did (which by the way and by facts alone they are doing better than almost anyone else at this time!)

If the people leading the industry do not win, then it’s really time for an overhaul of the Emmy Award, hell with the Internet and social media we really don’t need them anymore. The power is in the people’s hands now and we are more than capable of making up our own minds!

In the end, when all is said and done, it is the viewers that matter…plain and simple! AND we love The Walking Dead! Spread this around freely and as much as possible, it’s time they learn the power of social media!


The Walking Dead: 4 Seasons in 4 Minutes | What’s Trending Original #TheWalkingDead #TWDUpdate

What’s Trending’s Ethan Newberry gives a quick wrap up of everything that’s happened in AMC’s hit show The Walking Dead up to this very point. If you’re not caught up… SPOILERS! Subscribe for more videos: http://full.sc/NfhdwD

Original Content By:
The Walking Dead – AMC Network Entertainment

Let us know your favorite videos of the day in the comments! If we make a video based on your suggestion, we’ll let everyone know the mad genius behind it all.

Follow us on Twitter for real-time updates!
http://www.twitter.com/whatstrending

Like us on Facebook!
http://www.facebook.com/WhatsTrending

Add us to your circles on Google+!
https://plus.google.com/+WhatsTrending

Sign-up to our newsletter for the hottest videos straight to your inbox!
http://bit.ly/wtnewsletter

Edited By: Brian Lew
Music By: Bradley Register